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Bijambare (caves) protected landscape – Bijambare tract, encompassing 370 ha, is recently proclaimed by law as protected area of the fifth grade ‘’protected landscape’’. It is traditionally highly valued because of its natural beauty and richness.

At altitude averaging 950 m a.s.l. thick old evergreen forest with various pine trees and fresh air is found. There are also beautiful meadows crossed by two creaks that form small lakes and sink underground into karstified limestone rock base. Being situated in the karstic region area is rich with most karst phenomena such as karstic depressions, sinkholes and, most importantly, 6 known caves.

Certainly, the greatest attraction is the presence and accessibility of caves that are nicely grouped. In three horizons there are five caves that are named and better known, but there is also one more unnamed cave and possibly even more undiscovered ones. The largest cave is called Bijambare main cave, or sometimes: mid-Bijambare or simply Bijambare.

The main cave is of considerable magnitude, 420 m long (along the main path, neglecting branches) with 4 huge “halls” stretching up to 60 m in the diameter and to over 30 m in height. One of the halls (the last one) is commonly called “concert-hall” due to its impressive size. The cave is rich with cave “jewellery” forms such as stalactites, stalagmites, curtains, basins, side-blocks and alike. It is presently inhabited by colony of bats and crickets. Other inhabitants could possibly also be found.